Architecture inspiration from a writers perspective

After the longest wait of almost three years of working and being held in one place, I finally got the opportunity to travel and try to reignite my creativity with a simple ‘change of the scenery’.

Our eyes are passageways that go both outwards in, and the other way around. The mimetic nature that humans developed as a race has allowed us to perceive, portray and even change and control the inhabited surroundings.

A funky neighborly apartment door view…

Has it ever occurred to you that some spaces ‘feel better’ because of that hidden vintage armchair, beautiful view on a square or fountain? Ofcourse, our characters may differ, and as a landscape view from a high-rooftop may seem liberating to you, it can also give a sense of power, pride or even captivity to someone else.

I recently read a BBC article discussing the circular impact that shaping buildings and residential surroundings have on culture. Now, scientifically there is more to be researched on how spatially sensitive neurons impact our cognitive map.

Even though natural sciences are far beyond my expertise, the correlation of a personal sensation to an array of articles and researchers additionally sparks up my drive to reflect on how physical space impacts the process behind the writing of a poem or story.

 

Kertész street, Budapest, Hungary

I always choose a restaurant, cafe or a spot in the park by the most characteristic surroundings. My everyday walks are driven by curiosity and guessing the stories behind buildings, walls and tenant units.

During my last visit to Budapest, I had a majestic view of older buildings that perfectly reflect that urban atmosphere from the time when people started leaving their villages and living in towns because of better chances for education, expansion of business and in search of prosperity. Thinking of their children and trying to comprehend economy and industrialization (which rapidly started expanding over three centuries ago), people left their smaller hometowns and started hurdling in cities … This is the general story of how some of our ancestors decided to live in bigger towns, and why most of us are living in them even today.

 

Exterior detail across the building 33 Kertész street, Budapest; window view

 

Now, with Kertesz street being located in the Seventh district, the sense of community with common yards and shared terraces only contributed to my imagination, as this part of town was mostly a shelter and home for Jewish residents in Budapest. I cannot help it and wonder how many souls were thinking about their relatives and living in fear during the Second World War? According to R.E. Gruber, bullet holes from the last World War were still well present in residential building walls during the early 2000s.  Now, on the other side, the architecture and entire neighborhood seem to be going through a renaissance period on its own. Looking up at the history and significance of the seventh district, I discovered projects that focus on the beauty and emphasize the unique growth of former traditional Jewish urban settings with contemporary buildings and empty spaces that are waiting to be rediscovered.

The connection of architecture and literature is profound, both are man made arts and come as a reflection and captivation of our surroundings. They come as a product of will and can hide the purest of artistic form. Have you ever looked up to enjoy sight and settings of a shabby building? Just like in some old books, you can find tiny segments that can greatly impact you.

A mosaic exterior detail somewhere on the streets of Budapest.

I hope you enjoyed this little brain picker. Feel free to comment ask and discuss this topic in the comments section below and I will try to reply as soon as I can. In the coming days, I will publish some of my brain doodles of prose and poetry segments that were inspired by the architecture and people from this beautiful country.

 

 

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